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The University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital (UPTH) has opened an 18-bed capacity isolation centre for testing and treatment of COVID-19 patients.

The Chief Medical Director (CMD) of UPTH, Henry Ugboma, disclosed this on Tuesday at the inauguration of the centre in Port Harcourt.

He said the hospital is concerned with the increasing number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 across the country.

“Based on this, UPTH, with the support of the federal government, decided to build an isolation, treatment and testing centre for coronavirus patients.

“The centre has capacity for 18-bed spaces but presently, we have 14 beds already installed in the facility.

“The centre is equipped with ventilators and the personal protective equipment (PPE) donated by NIMASA, Salvation Ministries and other well-spirited individuals and organisations.

Mr Ugboma said the centre would be upgraded to accommodate more patients in the unfortunate event of community outbreak in the state.

He said the hospital was currently expecting additional equipment from other organisations to enable it to effectively tackle the pandemic.

“Presently, we have three ventilators, dedicated only to COVID-19 patients, just as we also have seven others in our intensive care units for the management of other patients.

“Aside this, we also have PPE and other gadgets needed for the treatment of coronavirus patients. However, what we have is not enough.

“So we are hoping that multinational companies, both state and federal governments, as well as kind-spirited individuals will provide us with additional equipment,” he said.

Mr Ugboma said UPTH had the expertise and facilities to tackle the disease, saying that testing and treatment were free for those with COVID-19 symptoms.

The UPTH CMD explained that another isolation and treatment centre, built by the Federal Government for treatment of other cases, like Ebola, was still in use by the hospital.

(NAN)

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